Lucia di Lammermoor

di Gaetano Donizetti

Dutch National Opera http://www.operaballet.nl/en/opera/

Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • marzo 2014
    14
    venerdì
    20:00 > 23:00
    3 ore
  • marzo 2014
    17
    lunedì
    20:00 > 23:00
    3 ore
  • marzo 2014
    21
    venerdì
    20:00 > 23:00
    3 ore
  • marzo 2014
    23
    domenica
    20:00 > 23:00
    3 ore
  • marzo 2014
    27
    giovedì
    20:00 > 23:00
    3 ore
  • marzo 2014
    30
    domenica
    20:00 > 23:00
    3 ore
  • aprile 2014
    03
    giovedì
    20:00 > 23:00
    3 ore
  • aprile 2014
    06
    domenica
    20:00 > 23:00
    3 ore
Scopri di più su Interpreti , Composizione , Compositore

Lucia di Lammermoor

Interpreti

Stampa e Recensioni

Daily Review
Jason Whittaker
Lucia di Lammermoor review (Her Majesty’s Theatre, Melbourne)
Questa recensione si riferisce a Lucia di Lammermoor al Victorian Opera.
Non disponibile in italiano
This is Usain Bolt in the Olympic final. Cristiano Ronaldo at the World Cup. The greatest athlete on the biggest stage. ... They say nobody in the world sings the maddening title role in Lucia Di Lammermoor — perhaps the most treacherous test composed for a coloratura soprano — better than Jessica Pratt. They used to say the same thing about another Aussie, Joan Sutherland, in the 1960s. ... The moment of ecstasy is thrilling — the famed final-act “mad scene” (aria Il dolce suono) where a bloodied Lucia stumbles down a grand staircase, fresh from murdering her unwanted hubby, in a love-sick hallucination conjuring her star-crossed lover. Pratt is beguiling, her instrument as vivid as we’ve heard on Australian stages. It’s the combination of power and poise in her voice, toying with the score as much as the audience, drawing you in with a delicate trill and pushing you back in your seat with an unfathomably sustained note of spine-tingling vibrato.
Classic Melbourne
Heater Leviston
Victorian Opera: Lucia di Lammermoor
Questa recensione si riferisce a Lucia di Lammermoor al Victorian Opera.
Non disponibile in italiano
..and Jessica Pratt is certainly one of these [Best Singers]. Despite having to contend with the expectations raised by the hype surrounding her as the successor to Melba and Dame Joan, she still amazes. With limited opportunity to warm up, her ability to sustain a smooth legato line in Lucia’s initial aria, “Regnava nel silenzio”, was truly impressive. Although she has the art of soft singing honed to pinpoint perfection, her voice has substance and was always audible, including in the weightier ensembles such as the famous sextet at the end of Act 2. Her skill in floating her voice in long, high pianissimo phrases was most striking in the Mad Scene, where she was accompanied by a haunting, otherworldly glass harmonica. Pratt’s flexibility and wide range produced streams of impressive bravura and stratospheric top notes, generally without apparent effort.
Limelight
Maxim Boon
Review: Lucia di Lammermoor (Victorian Opera)
Questa recensione si riferisce a Lucia di Lammermoor al Victorian Opera.
Non disponibile in italiano
Pratt is surely an artist destined to earn the same iconic stature and enduring legacy as Sutherland, and her account of Lucia – a role that she has performed more than any other – made good on her reputation as one of the world’s most insightful and adept performers of the bel canto canon. ... Of course, this is a voice capable of some jaw-dropping pyrotechnics, but perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of Pratt’s singing is not the power that she can deliver, but the restraint. This willingness to allow such a delicately crafted tone, particularly during the dramatic epicentre of this work, the third act mad scene, shows a total reverence for Donizetti’s ingenuity as a composer, as well as a deep understanding of the vulnerability of this character. In a duet with the spectral, crystalline otherworldliness of a glass harmonica, Pratt’s voice became intertwined with such sympathetic skill that the two sonorities were almost indistinguishable. This was singing that wasn’t just haunting: it was spellbinding.

Sydney Morning Herald
Michael Shmith
Lucia Di Lammermoor review: Jessica Pratt ascends vocal stratosphere
Questa recensione si riferisce a Lucia di Lammermoor al Victorian Opera.
Non disponibile in italiano
...she produced some remarkable singing: as Pratt's Lucia descended into the delusional, her technique ascended into the vocal stratosphere with some gloriously florid singing. No more so, than in her eerie duet with (as originally composed) glass-harmonica obbligato, which is the aural equivalent of being stabbed with a dagger fashioned not from steel but ice.
Il corriere musicale
Attilio Piovano
Lucia al Regio di Torino secondo Michieletto
Questa recensione si riferisce a Lucia di Lammermoor al Teatro Regio.
“Alla prima, mercoledì 11 maggio 2016, ha cantato il soprano Jessica Pratt che ricordavamo –interprete di lusso – la scorsa stagione, in un’indimenticabile edizione del Giulio Cesare di Haendel. Singolare fuoriclasse, la Pratt ha voce significativa e spiccate doti attoriali; conseguentemente il suo è stato un vero e proprio trionfo. Soprattutto, ha convinto tutti, ma proprio tutti, nella scena della pazzia, tenendo l’intero teatro col fiato sospeso e duettando (secondo l’originale dettato di Donizetti) non già con un flauto, come da consolidata prassi esecutiva, bensì con la glass harmonica dal suono arcano, evocativo e fascinoso, dal forte impatto emotivo. E in tal scena, quando ha attaccato Spargi d’amaro pianto, anzi a dire il vero prima ancora, in Ardon gli incensi, la Pratt ha giganteggiato, fornendo un’interpretazione di gran livello (…).”
Herald Sun
Paul Selar
Jessica Pratt gives outstanding performance in Lucia di Lammermoor for Victorian Opera
Questa recensione si riferisce a Lucia di Lammermoor al Victorian Opera.
Non disponibile in italiano
During its intoxicating 20 minutes, Pratt channels the pitiable tragedienne in a hypnotic performance without excessive histrionics and meets the vocal and dramatic demands with an unflinching, focussed performance. It’s a powerful and near-distressing experience as the silenced chorus and audience remain transfixed by Pratt’s incisive interpretation and striking coloratura soprano. Broad in range and sumptuous in tone, Pratt melds music, text and emotion exquisitely as she glides to delicate crystalline highs and effortlessly projects the finest pianissimo.

L'Opera
Alessandro Mormile
Questa recensione si riferisce a Lucia di Lammermoor al Teatro Regio.
...una scena della Pazzia dove la cadenza ha una pulizia di suono di valenza strumentale che, complice l'utilizzo della glassarmonica, dona un effetto di straniamento suggestivo ad un virtuosismo che la vede vincente su tutta la linea
La Repubblica
Angelo Foletto
Questa recensione si riferisce a Lucia di Lammermoor al Teatro Regio.
la spavalda e brillante prestazione protagonistica di Jessica Pratt
La Stampa
Giorgio Pestelli
Questa recensione si riferisce a Lucia di Lammermoor al Teatro Regio.
la scena della pazzia, perché qui Jessica Pratt sfoggia le due frecce più appuntite al suo arco, gli acuti e i suoni filati in pianissimo in cui è davvero una fuori classe

Composizione

Lucia di Lammermoor

Libretto scritto in italian da Salvadore Cammarano, messo in scena la prima volta di sabato il 26 settembre del 1835
Non disponibile in italiano
Lucia di Lammermoor is a dramma tragico (tragic opera) in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti. Salvadore Cammarano wrote the Italian language libretto loosely based upon Sir Walter Scott's historical novel The Bride of Lammermoor. Donizetti wrote Lucia di Lammermoor in 1835, a time when several factors led to the height of his reputation as a composer of opera. Gioachino Rossini had recently retired and Vincenzo Bellini had died shortly before the premiere of Lucia leaving Donizetti as "the sole reigning genius of Italian opera". Not only were conditions ripe for Donizetti's success as a composer, but there was also a European interest in the history and culture of Scotland. The perceived romance of its violent wars and feuds, as well as its folklore and mythology, intrigued 19th century readers and audiences. Sir Walter Scott made use of these stereotypes in his novel The Bride of Lammermoor, which inspired several musical works including Lucia. The story concerns the emotionally fragile Lucy Ashton (Lucia) who is caught in a feud between her own family and that of the Ravenswoods. The setting is the Lammermuir Hills of Scotland (Lammermoor) in the 17th century.
Sinossi
Non disponibile in italiano
Time: Early 18th century Place: Scotland ACT 1 Scene 1: The gardens of Lammermoor Castle Normanno, captain of the castle guard, and other retainers are searching for an intruder. He tells Enrico that he believes that the man is Edgardo, and that he comes to the castle to meet Enrico's sister, Lucia. It is confirmed that Edgardo is indeed the intruder. Enrico reaffirms his hatred for the Ravenswood family and his determination to end the relationship. Scene 2: By a fountain at the entrance to the park, beside the castle Lucia waits for Edgardo. In her famous aria "Regnava nel silenzio", Lucia tells her maid Alisa that she has seen the ghost of a girl killed on the very same spot by a jealous Ravenswood ancestor. Alisa tells Lucia that the apparition is a warning and that she must give up her love for Edgardo. Edgardo enters; for political reasons, he must leave immediately for France. He hopes to make his peace with Enrico and marry Lucia. Lucia tells him this is impossible, and instead they take a sworn vow of marriage and exchange rings. Edgardo leaves. ACT 2 Scene 1: Lord Ashton's apartments in Lammermoor Castle Preparations have been made for the imminent wedding of Lucia to Arturo. Enrico worries about whether Lucia will really submit to the wedding. He shows his sister a forged letter seemingly proving that Edgardo has forgotten her and taken a new lover. Enrico leaves Lucia to further persuasion this time by Raimondo, Lucia's chaplain and tutor, that she should renounce her vow to Edgardo, for the good of the family, and marry Arturo. Scene 2: A hall in the castle Arturo arrives for the marriage. Lucia acts strangely, but Enrico explains that this is due to the death of her mother. Arturo signs the marriage contract, followed reluctantly by Lucia. At that point Edgardo suddenly appears in the hall. Raimondo prevents a fight, but he shows Lucia's signature on the marriage contract to Edgardo. He curses her, demanding that they return their rings to each other. He tramples his ring on the ground, before being forced out of the castle. ACT 3 Scene 1: The Wolf's Crag Enrico visits Edgardo to challenge him to a duel. He tells him that Lucia is already enjoying her bridal bed. Edgardo agrees to fight him. They will meet later by the graveyard of the Ravenswoods, near the Wolf's Crag. Scene 2: A Hall in Lammermoor Castle Raimondo interrupts the marriage celebrations to tell the guests that Lucia has gone mad and killed her bridegroom Arturo. Lucia enters. In the aria "Il dolce suono" she imagines being with Edgardo, soon to be happily married. Enrico enters and at first threatens Lucia but later softens when he realizes her condition. Lucia collapses. Raimondo blames Normanno for precipitating the whole tragedy. Scene 3: The graveyard of the Ravenswood family Edgardo is resolved to kill himself on Enrico's sword. He learns that Lucia is dying and then Raimondo comes to tell him that she has already died. Edgardo stabs himself with a dagger, hoping to be reunited with Lucia in heaven.

Gaetano Donizetti

Breve biografia del compositore
Domenico Gaetano Maria Donizetti (Bergamo, 29 novembre 1797 – Bergamo, 8 aprile 1848) scrisse più di settanta opere, oltre a numerose composizioni di musica sacra e da camera. Le opere del Donizetti oggi più sovente rappresentate nei teatri di tutto il mondo sono L'elisir d'amore, la Lucia di Lammermoor e il Don Pasquale. Con frequenza sono allestite anche La fille du régiment, La Favorite, la Maria Stuarda, l'Anna Bolena, la Lucrezia Borgia e il Roberto Devereux. Nato a Bergamo il 29 novembre 1797, fu ammesso alle lezioni caritatevoli di musica tenute da Giovanni Simone Mayr e Francesco Salari. Fu proprio il Mayr ad aprire all'allievo prediletto le possibilità di successo, curandone prima la formazione e affidandolo poi alle cure di Stanislao Mattei. A Bologna, dove proseguiva gli studi musicali, il Donizetti scrisse la sua prima opera teatrale, Il Pigmalione. La rappresentazione "Enrico di Borgogna" a Venezia nel 1818, segnò il suo esordio teatrale. Firmato nel 1827 un contratto con l’impresario Domenico Barbaya, Donizetti si stabilì a Napoli, raggiungendo il grande successo con "Anna Bolena" ed "Elisir d’Amore". Nel 1829 era stato nominato direttore dei Teatri Reali di Napoli e, nel 1834, accettò la Cattedra di Composizione al Conservatorio della stessa città. Nel 1832, alla morte di Vincenzo Bellini, nonostante l'antipatia dimostrata in vita nei confronti del musicista, Donizetti gli dedicò una Messa da Requem. Nel 1835, Donizetti fece rappresentare a Napoli la "Lucia di Lammermoor" e, mentre la vita professionale del compositore andava a gonfie vele, venne colpito da una serie di lutti: in pochi mesi morirono il padre, la madre e la seconda figlia. Donizetti interruppe ogni sua attività in Italia per recarsi a Parigi, su consiglio di Gioachino Rossini. Nonostante la sfortuna continuasse a perseguitare il musicista con la morte della moglie e di un'altra figlia, Gaetano Donizetti curò il dispiacere e la solitudine componendo in pochi anni "Don Pasquale", "Don Sebastiano del Portogallo", "Linda di Chamounix", "Maria di Rohanna" e il "Conte di Chalais". Nel 1842 ricevette a Vienna l’ambita nomina di Maestro di Cappella di Corte, ma la sua salute, peggiorò sempre di più ed alla fine fu internato nel manicomio di Ivry-sur-Seine. Nel 1847, Donizetti,trasportato a Bergamo, fu accolto dai baroni Basoni Scotti, che lo assistettero fino alla morte, sopravvenuta l'8 Aprile 1848.

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